Steveston Harbour Net Recycling

Looking for a way to get rid of your old seine / gill net? Tired of paying storage fees for end of life fishing gear you probably won’t use again? Want to avoid paying hundreds or even thousands of dollars taking it to a landfill where it will simply be buried, posing a potential environmental hazard for decades to come? We can help.

If your net is no longer suitable for fishing and is predominantly nylon (no matter the condition – brittle, UV-damaged nets are absolutely fine), we can take your net off your hands at no cost to you and put it through our net recycling program here at Steveston Harbour. Currently, we are only able to recycle nylon net (most seine and gill net web) and not the polypropylene border web / bunt, however we are working on a pilot project with Plastix out of Denmark whereby we will also be able to recycle all kinds of fishing gear (polyethylene nets, polypropylene ropes, crab traps, prawn pots, cork line, lead line, etc.). Currently, we will take scraps or entire nets, complete with bunt, border web, cork line and lead line, etc. so long as there is a significant amount of nylon present as well.

So, how does it work? Rather than paying storage fees on your unused derelict nets, or paying to have them disposed of in a landfill, bring them to us instead and we can take them and recycle them for you at no cost to you. All you need to do is find a way to get your net to Steveston Harbour (unless it’s already here, of course), and we’ll take it so long as it has a significant portion of nylon to it – it’s that easy! This value-added service is also 100% cost neutral to Steveston Harbour Authority.

As a part of this process, we also end up with a significant amount of lead line, cork line and polypropylene web as by-products, so if you need any of those items, or if you would like further details on how to recycle your nets, contact Steveston Harbour Operations Supervisor Joel Baziuk at 604-272-5539 or joel@stevestonharbour.com.

For more information on how it’s done, click here.

For more information on how the program started and where it’s headed, click here.